Tag Archives: read in 2012

Wondrous Word Wednesday

Wondrous Words Wednesday is a weekly meme from Bermuda Onion where we share new (to us) words that we’ve encountered in our reading.  If you want to play along, grab the button, and write a post.

My words this week are from Shadow of Night by Deborah Harkness.

elocution - the skill of clear and expressive speech, esp. of distinct pronunciation and articulation.

“I would be happy to give you elocution lessons, Mistress Roydon.”

prescient – having or showing knowledge of events before they take place.

“If you are so prescient, then you should have foreseen what your betrayal would mean to me.”

crenellations – the battlements of a castle or other building.

“Smoke came from chimneys tucked out of sight behind the towers’ crenellations, the jagged outlines suggesting that some crazed giant with pinking shears had trimmed every wall.”

oubliette – a secret dungeon with access only through a trapdoor in its ceiling

“When she failed, Satu threw me into the oubliette.”

hippocras – wine flavored with spices

“By the time the hippocras started flowing and a delicious nut brittle made with walnuts and honey was passed along the table, their commentary was downright ribald and Matthew’s responses were just as barbed.”

 

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Wondrous Word Wednesday

Wondrous Words Wednesday is a weekly meme from Bermuda Onion where we share new (to us) words that we’ve encountered in our reading.  If you want to play along, grab the button, and write a post.

My word this week is from The Journeys of John and Julia in Chapter One by aurelia.

ersatzadj. made or used as a substitute, typically an inferior one, for something else.

“However, spatial proximity was only the obvious reason for his close relationship with this ersatz grandfather.”

 

What words did you encounter this week?

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Raven Cursed – Review

Raven Cursed by Faith Hunter
Released: January 2012
Publisher: Penguin Group
Age Group: Adult
Pages: 353
Source: Birthday Present!
Jane Yellowrock is a shape-shifting skinwalker and vampire hunter for hire. But lately instead of just slaying vampires, she’s been working for them.

The vampires of Asheville, North Carolina, want to establish their own clan, but since they owe loyalty to the Master Vampire of New Orleans they must work out the terms with him. To come up with an equitable solution, he sends an envoy with the best bodyguard blood money can buy: Jane Yellowrock.

But when a group of local campers are attacked by something fanged, Jane goes from escort to investigator. Unless she wants to face a very angry master vampire, she will have to work overtime to find the killer. It’s a good thing she’s worth every penny.  (from faithhunter.net)

My Thoughts:

I love Jane Yellowrock – not only is she tall and rides a motorcycle, she totally kicks butt!  This is the fourth book in the series by Faith Hunter, following Skinwalker, Blood Cross, and Mercy Blade.  

Jane is a skin-walker, and as far as she knows, the last of her kind.  This makes her different than the were-animals present in these books. She is also a vampire slayer.  Specifically, a rouge-vampire slayer – when one goes crazy and begins killing humans or other vampires, Jane is called in to stake them – or whatever it takes to eliminate them.  The “person” who calls her is Leonard Eugene Zacharie Pellissier, the Master Of the City of New Orleans, who controls the hunting license for every vampire below the Mason-Dixon line, from the eastern border of Texas at the Sabine River, east to the Atlantic, and south to the Gulf, with the exception of Florida and Atlanta, GA.

In Raven Cursed, Jane has traveled to Asheville, North Carolina to provide security for a vamp parley.  Lincoln Shaddock, the most powerful “fanghead” in the Appalachian Mountains of North Carolina and Tennessee, had been applying to Leo for sixty years for the right to become a master of the city.  Leo had turned him down – until now.

Jane is running a security team to provide safe transport to the arriving vamps, and Gregoire, Leo’s representative and heir.  This should be a relatively easy assignment, as the hotel has provided vampire safe suites, and Leo has provided armored SUV’s.  Unfortunately they didn’t plan for rouge werewolves, a grindylow (a “pet” who polices were’s to make sure they don’t purposefully infect anyone), murders, witches using blood magic and Ricky Bo – her on again off again boyfriend.

Jane’s personal and professional life collide, and she faces the possibility of losing both her friends and her job.  This book includes vampires, witches (both good and bad), were-cats, were-wolves, grindylows, and human law enforcement officers.  In a world where humans have accepted the existence of supernatural beings formerly believed to be legend, the burden of proof is on the “supernats” to maintain their innocence in the murders happening around Asheville.  Jane risks her life, her inner beast and her closest friends to protect the vampires who hired her, and protect innocent humans and other supernats from the vengeful werewolves wreaking havoc in the North Carolina mountains.

I always enjoy Jane Yellowrock, and if you like Paranormal Fiction/Paranormal Romance, give Faith Hunter’s Jane Yellowrock series a try!

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Armchair BEA – 2012 – Networking about Books

Armchair BEA is for book bloggers who can’t attend Book Expo America and the Book Blogger Convention in New York this June (June 4 – 8, 2012).  So we don’t have to miss all the fun – this virtual convention is the place to be!

Have you ever wondered how bloggers get so involved outside the nuts & bolts community of book blogging? Well, now’s your chance to learn from the experts! From partnering with their local indie bookstores to coordinating events at their local libraries, we’ve got tips to share with you to help you become more involved with your local bookish community.  Guest post from top bloggers (Emily from Emily’s Reading Room, Tif from Tif Talks Books and Pam from Bookalicious) about how they were able to work together with their local bookish community to benefit everyone involved.
I don’t feel like I have a lot of experience to talk about with regard to meeting other book bloggers, (which I hope to change in the future) but I have a favorite author signing to share.  I always try to read the books that my daughter is assigned in school so we can talk about them.  She was assigned the book Sixty-Eight Rooms by Marianne Malone, and the author came to her school to answer questions about her book.  That was exciting, but it was even more exciting to be able to meet Ms. Malone one-on-one at our local bookstore and have her sign the book, answer individual questions my daughter and her bestie had, and pose for a picture with them.  Such a great experience for my budding book lover!
Here’s a picture of my lil’ heart with the author.

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Teaser Tuesday

Teaser Tuesdays is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by MizB of Should Be Reading.  Anyone can play along! Just do the following:

Grab your current read.
Open to a random page.
Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page.
BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

This teaser is from Sizzling Sixteen by Janet Evanovich.  And, I typically share more than just two sentences.

“Lula and I stood in the living room, looking at Grandma’s foot.

‘It looks broke all right,’ Lula said to Grandma.  ‘That’s one heck of an ugly foot you got there, but I like the polish you got on your toes.  What’s the name of that?’

‘Red Hot Rapture.  Lucky I just painted them yesterday.  Imagine breaking your foot when your toes weren’t done up.’

‘Yeah,’ Lula said, ‘I’d hate that.  Does it hurt?’

‘It used to, but I took a couple snorts of Jack Daniels, and I’m pretty happy.'”

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May – It’s a Wrap!

Here is a list of the books I read for May – and looking at this list versus the number of reviews I’ve written, is in a word, sad.  I have got to do more review writing!  I get so busy reading that I don’t sit down enough to write more reviews.

Four to Score by Janet Evanovich

High Five by Janet Evanovich

Hot Six by Janet Evanovich

Divergent by Veronica Roth

Dust & Decay by Jonathan Maberry

The Shunning by Beverly Lewis – My Review

Fifty Shades of Grey by E. L. James – Kindle E-Book

Fifty Shades Darker by E. L. James – Kindle E-Book

Seven Up by Janet Evanovich

Hard Eight by Janet Evanovich

To the Nines by Janet Evanovich

Ten Big Ones by Janet Evanovich

Eleven on Top by Janet Evanovich

Twelve Sharp by Janet Evanovich

Lean Mean Thirteen by Janet Evanovich

City of Lies by Lian Tanner

Legend by Marie Lu – My Review

Fearless Fourteen by Janet Evanovich

The Treehouse Book by Pete & Judy Nelson

Life As We Knew It by Susan Beth Pfeffer – Kindle E-book – My Review

All Through the Night by Grace Livingston Hill

A Stolen Life by Jaycee Lee Dugard – My Review

Shiver by Maggie Stiefvater

Finger Lickin’ Fifteen by Janet Evanovich

As you can see, I’ve read almost the entire Stephanie Plum series by Janet Evanovich this month.  Is it possible to read too many of these books?  I saw a read Firebird the other day and my first thought was, “Oh, there’s Lula!”

24 books in May puts me at 87 for the year, a little more than half-way to this year’s goal of reading 150 books!  Another goal I’ve made, mid-year (actually just now), is to write more reviews!!!  :)

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Review – “A Stolen Life”

 

From Goodreads:

“In the summer of 1991 I was a normal kid. I did normal things. I had friends and a mother who loved me. I was just like you. Until the day my life was stolen.  For eighteen years I was a prisoner. I was an object for someone to use and abuse.

For eighteen years I was not allowed to speak my own name. I became a mother and was forced to be a sister. For eighteen years I survived an impossible situation.

On August 26, 2009, I took my name back. My name is Jaycee Lee Dugard. I don’t think of myself as a victim. I survived.

A Stolen Life is my story—in my own words, in my own way, exactly as I remember it.”

My review:

Before I read A Stolen Life I saw an interview with Jaycee Dugard by Diane Sawyer, and was amazed at her inner strength and positive attitude.  She didn’t act or present herself as a victim, she wasn’t full of hate or regret, but was thankful for her freedom, her family and her daughters.  When I saw her autobiography at the library, I wanted to read it.  If she had presented herself negatively in her interview, I probably wouldn’t have picked up her book.

She describes her abduction and subsequent abuse with candor, but as tastefully as possible.  The book isn’t full of gory sexual details, but she tells you enough to understand her abductor’s sickness and that he is the father of her children.  She misses her mother and sister, but rarely mentions them in her journals because it is so painful.  The book tells the story of her life during her captivity, of the animals that kept her company, her tentative relationship with her abductor’s wife, the birth of her daughters, and her desire for them to learn what they were missing by not being able to attend school.  She had only achieved a fifth grade education before her abduction, but when granted access to the internet for her abductor’s fledgling printing business, she found websites for homeschools that enabled her to educate her daughters beyond her own grade-level.

Her daughter’s were raised to believe she was their sister, and called her Alissa, a name she chose when she was told she could never use or speak of her real name.   While she longed to be the girl’s mother in their minds, she knew that she has to cooperate with her abductor to keep her girl’s safe.  Her first child was born when she was 14 yrs old, and her second child followed two year later.  When she was 29 she finally admitted to concerned officers who she was, and that she was the girl’s biological mother.  Her daughters were 13 and 15 at the time, and had rarely been out of the “secret backyard” that had been their home.

Her story tells of her fears and struggles after her abduction, her feelings about her abductors, her hopes to be reunited with her family, and the reunification with her family after her identity was known.  She shares such a positive outlook on her life, and appreciates her freedom and opportunities that she had given up hope of having ever again.

As a mother, this story scares me nearly to death!  To imagine my daughter going through what Jaycee went through is horrifying – to imagine not being with my daughter for 18 years is grievous.  Its something no family should ever go through.

I rated the book a 3 out of 5.  While the writing style wasn’t extremely compelling, her inner strength and love for her family made for a positive retelling of her life.

 

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