Tag Archives: fantasy

Lake Silence – By Anne Bishop (The Others #6)

I really enjoy reading Anne Bishop’s books, but “The Others” is my favorite series. I’ve been waiting on book #6 since March of this year (2017), and I was lucky enough to get an ARC copy of this book. I read straight through it in less than 24 hours. If you enjoy fantasy, but the believable kind, the kind that makes you think “What if?”, or “Am I alone?” when you’re out hiking in the woods, you’ll enjoy these books.

Basically the world has been inhabited since creation by a species called the Terre Indigene, or The Others, and they control the earth. They are Elementals (Fire, Water, Air, etc.), Shifters (Crowgard, Beargard, Wolfgard, etc.) and the Elders, who have been around the longest, and stay in the wild until they are called upon to mete out justice in some way.

As the history is explained, “a long time ago Namid gave birth to all kinds of life, including the beings known as humans. She gave the humans fertile pieces of herself, and she gave them good water. Understanding their nature and the nature of her other offspring, she also gave them enough isolation that they would have a chance to survive and grow. And they did. They bred and spread throughout their pieces of the world until they pushed into the wild places. That’s when they discovered that Namid’s other offspring already claimed the rest of the world. The Others looked at humans and did not see conquerors. They saw a new kind of meat. Wars were fought to possess the wild places. Sometimes the humans won and spread their seed a little farther. More often, pieces of civilization disappeared, and fearful survivors tried not to shiver when a howl went up in the night or a man, wandering too far from the safety of stout doors and light, was found the next morning drained of blood. Centuries passed. Humans were smart. So were the Others.

Humans invented electricity and plumbing. The Others controlled all the rivers that could power the generators and all the lakes that supplied fresh drinking water. Humans invented and manufactured products. The Others controlled all the natural resources, thereby deciding what would and wouldn’t be made in their part of the world. So it comes to the current age. Small human villages exist within vast tracts of land that belongs to the Others, And in larger human cities, there are fenced parks called Courtyards that are inhabited by the Others who have the task of keeping watch over the city’s residents and enforcing the agreements the humans made with the terra indigene.

In “Lake Silence”, a battered ex-wife, Vicky Dane, gets a small, very rustic (read primitive) resort property on the banks of Lake Silence, which is a human town, but not human controlled. She follows every rule laid out by the land owners (the Others) in the renovations and repairs to the cabins and main house with her limited resources, while her greedy ex-husband is partnering with unseemly characters from his past to reclaim this property from her, despite her capital improvements. He trusts in his ability to cow and control her to regain this property, despite her legal standing. Unbeknownst to him, she has gained the trust and even friendship of some of the Others living locally, and they prefer her residence to his. When he and his colleagues show up to evict her, it angers not only the Crowgard, Beargard and Panthergard, but some of the Elementals and Elders, and does not turn out well for the hoity-toity Mr. Dane.

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Wondrous Word Wednesday

Wondrous Words Wednesday is a weekly meme from Bermuda Onion where we share new (to us) words that we’ve encountered in our reading.  If you want to play along, grab the button, and write a post.

My words this week are from Shadow of Night by Deborah Harkness.

elocution – the skill of clear and expressive speech, esp. of distinct pronunciation and articulation.

“I would be happy to give you elocution lessons, Mistress Roydon.”

prescient – having or showing knowledge of events before they take place.

“If you are so prescient, then you should have foreseen what your betrayal would mean to me.”

crenellations – the battlements of a castle or other building.

“Smoke came from chimneys tucked out of sight behind the towers’ crenellations, the jagged outlines suggesting that some crazed giant with pinking shears had trimmed every wall.”

oubliette – a secret dungeon with access only through a trapdoor in its ceiling

“When she failed, Satu threw me into the oubliette.”

hippocras – wine flavored with spices

“By the time the hippocras started flowing and a delicious nut brittle made with walnuts and honey was passed along the table, their commentary was downright ribald and Matthew’s responses were just as barbed.”

 

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Penguin Teen | The Kristin Cashore Graceling Realm digital…

Penguin Teen | The Kristin Cashore Graceling Realm digital….

 

For all the Kristin Cashore/Graceling fans out there, check out this Digital Sampler with exclusive content….includes excerpts from Bitterblue and letters between Bitterblue, Katsa, Raffin, Bann and Po.

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Fabulous Friday!!!

I am just beside myself with excitement!  I just came home to a package on my front porch from Penguin – it’s the new/upcoming release “Bitterblue” by Kristin Cashore!!!  This may be the most excited I’ve been to receive an ARC!  I will talk about it more on Mailbox Monday, but I was so happy I had to share my excitement with other “bookish” people!  🙂

For my fellow Graceling fan, Refuting the Intolerably Stupid, I thought of you as soon as I opened this package!!!  🙂

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Voices of Dragons

I picked this book up at the library on a whim – I’ve read Carrie Vaughn’s entire  Kitty Norville series and really like them.  I hope hope, fingers crossed, that this book is the start of a new series.

This book is about seventeen year old Kay Wyatt who lives in a border town with her father, Sheriff Wyatt and her mother, a member of the FBBE (Federal Bureau of Border Enforcement).  She loves to spend time hiking and climbing the cliffs near the border.  One afternoon she finishes her climb and stops at the creek to rinse off.  She slips and falls in, and is saved by a dragon from the other side of the border.  The dragons haven’t been seen much in the last 60 years since a treaty was reached between the dragons and humans.  At the risk of being punished, or causing political upset, they become friends and continue to meet.

The first chapter grabbed me about four pages in.

“The rock must have had a wet spot, or she hit a crumbly piece of boulder – gravel instead of stone, it slid instead of holding her foot.  Yelping, she toppled over and rolled into the creek.

The chill water shocked her sweaty, overheated body, and at first she could only freeze, numb and sputtering, hoping to keep her head above water.  The current carried her.  These mountain creeks were always deeper and faster moving than they looked, and she tumbled, dragged by the water, buffeted by rocks.  When she finally started flailing, struggling to find something, anything, she could grab to stop her progress, she found nothing.  Her hands kept slipping off mossy rocks or splashing against the current.  She’d always discounted the idea of someone drowning after getting swept away in one of these creeks, when they could just put their feet down and stand up.  But she couldn’t seem to get her feet under her.  The current kept snatching her, turning her, dunking her.  she was already exhausted from her climb, and now this.

When something grabbed at her, she clung to it.  A log, some kind of debris fallen into the creek.  That was what she though.  But her hands didn’t close on sodden bark or vegetation.  The thing she’d washed up against was slick, almost like plastic, but warm and yielding.  And it moved.  It closed around her and pulled.  Water filled her eyes; she couldn’t see.  The world seemed to flip.

Then she washed up on dry land.  She lay on solid, gritty earth and smelled dirt.  She sepnt a long moment coughing her lungs out, heaving up water until she couldn’t cough anymore.  Hunched over, learning how to breathe again, she got her first look around and realized she’d ended up on the north side of the creek.  The wrong side of the border.

A deep, short growl echoed above her.  She rolled over and looked up.  she was in shadow, and a dragon hunched over her.  A real dragon, close up.”

I really enjoyed this book, and hope there are more to come!  I give it four stars out of five!

You can read the Goodreads review here.

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Skinwalker

“Skinwalker” by Faith Hunter
Published July 7, 2009

Jane Yellowrock,(Dalonige i Digadoli), a Cherokee Skinwalker whose legal, but completely false, birth certificate puts her at age 29, is a vampire hunter. Her past is beyond reach, as she woke up wondering in the woods, naked, scarred and without memory of the English language. Before that she remembers bits and pieces of her father & grandmother, and her change into “Beast”, a part that is still with her. She believes she is over 100 years old, and her shape shifting and years living as “Beast”, a mountain lion, have kept her physical human age young.

Her shape shifting gives her abilities far beyond a normal human. She can scent and track, has better than normal vision and hearing and can move more than humanly quick – almost vamp quick. She can shift into almost any animal, although big cats are her favorite. She’s still not sure how she and Beast have come to their current duality, but they work together well in her line of work.

She is contracted by an old vamp named Katherine Fontaneau, of Kaitie’s Ladies) to come to New Orleans and track and kill a rogue vamp that is killing indiscriminately between humans and other vamps. Beast names this rogue “Liver Eater”, and with Beast’s help and at times, Beast’s form, Jane is able to track and kill the “Liver Eater”, who she finds is also a shape shifter and she believes, a Cherokee.

Faith Hunter writes this series with a believable knowledge of vamps, their blood servants and hierarchy, and enough knowledge of “The People” and their practices and beliefs to make it a very interesting read. Jane is precocious and aggressive, and her mouth gets her into as much trouble as her chosen line of work. Laugh out loud funny in parts, hard to put down all the way through.

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